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How to Improve Your Follow-Through

Slowly squeezing the trigger until the shot fires will result in a great follow-through. (Photo courtesy of BowhuntingMag.com)
Slowly squeezing the trigger until the shot fires will result in a great follow-through. (Photo courtesy of BowhuntingMag.com)

Champion archer Levi Morgan explains why you should stop worrying about your shot follow-through and how you can execute a surprise release

If you’ve shot a bow for any length of time, you have heard about follow-through. In this column, I am going to take a closer look at follow-through, specifically as it relates to your release hand/arm. In short, proper follow-through involves your release hand and arm falling away from the anchored position as the shot fires. A lot of people misunderstand what follow-through actually is. Most will say, “You really need to work on your follow-through,” or “Make sure you remember to follow through,” or something along those lines.

In reality, follow-through isn’t something you should be working on to have a great shot. Rather, it’s the result of a great shot. The goal in execution is a surprise release, where you aren’t anticipating the timing of that shot. When that happens, a good follow-through is inevitable.

I often hear the comment, “Man, that guy has a horrible follow-through.” But I learned long ago it does you absolutely no good to work on your follow-through, because “that guy” is just anticipating his shot, which is causing his horrible follow-through. Or rather, his lack of follow-through. You see, if I fire my release via conscious command, I am tensing those small muscles it takes to execute the shot, and my release hand will stay right next to my face instead of falling back.

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STARTING SEP 17, 2018
STARTING SEP 17, 2018