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Late-Summer Scouting Mistakes to Avoid

How often you check your trail cameras leading up to the season can affect daytime buck movement, so practice some discipline. (Photo courtesy of Bowhunter.com)
How often you check your trail cameras leading up to the season can affect daytime buck movement, so practice some discipline. (Photo courtesy of Bowhunter.com)

When it comes to scouting, without question, my favorite style is long-distance glassing. The problem I have with that is that my definition of long-distance can shorten up in a hurry if there is a particular field corner I want to watch and the only way to do it is to camo up and slip to within 100 yards of where the bucks should be. This, as you can imagine, is a great way to spook summertime deer if you’re not very, very careful.

I’m not always very, very careful, so…

The other problem I have with long-range glassing is that when I have the chance to go, I’m going. I like it too much to skip it, and that means I’m going to put more of my presence out there in the world of the whitetail and cross my fingers. Despite doing this for 25 years, I can still bring amateur hour to the woods without hardly any effort.

And then there are trail cameras. When I’ve got cameras in the woods, soaking away and doing the scouting for me, I want to check them every chance I can. And just like someone who is in denial of a far more serious addiction, I’ll find any excuse in the book to go out into the woods and get my SD card fix.

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STARTING SEP 16, 2019
STARTING SEP 16, 2019