Recipes

Best Tasting Venison: Tips for Proper Handling, Storage and Prep

For long-term storage, vacuum-seal venison meat in plastic bags and place in the freezer for ultimate freshness and taste. (Jenny Nguyen photo)
For long-term storage, vacuum-seal venison meat in plastic bags and place in the freezer for ultimate freshness and taste. (Jenny Nguyen photo)

For the best tasting venison, the steps taken from field to freezer, then from freezer to plate are critical; heed these wild game meat tips when handling, storing, prepping and cooking

Before there was commercial livestock, there was venison. As difficult as it is for most modern Americans to imagine, venison was once a major, fundamental source of protein for the peoples of North America. Deer was an everyday food, and people simply didn’t think twice about eating it.

Today, however, bring up venison among urban company and you might get raised eyebrows and the all-too-common question: “Doesn’t it taste tough and gamey?”

How did venison get this tough and gamy reputation? It’s a combination of reasons. Unlike store-bought meat, which was handled by professional slaughterers and butchers who know what they’re doing, the average American isn’t equipped with this knowledge, which is a bit of an art.

There’s a lot more to hunting for good table fare than shooting the most impressive-looking animal that walks into your crosshairs, cutting it up, and throwing it in the freezer or on the grill.

If you’re aiming to hunt deer for meat, keep these tips in mind and let it be your guide for the best possible tasting venison.

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STARTING SEP 17, 2018
STARTING SEP 17, 2018